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Hi. All my current writing is over at Audacious Fox, and I'd love to show you around. Thanks for reading.

The Wrong Dictionary

James Somers:

[In a dictionary], words are boiled to their essence. But that essence is dry, functional, almost bureaucratically sapped of color or pop, like high modernist architecture. Which trains you to think of the dictionary as a utility, not a quarry of good things, not a place you’d go to explore and savor.

Worse, the words themselves take on the character of their definitions: they are likewise reduced. A delightful word like “fustian” — delightful because of what it means, because of the way it looks and sounds, because it is unusual in regular speech but not so effete as to be unusable, is described, efficiently, as “pompous or pretentious speech or writing.” Not only is this definition (as we’ll see in a minute) simplistic and basically wrong, it’s just not in the same class, English-wise, as “fustian.” The language is tin-eared and uninspired. It’s criminal: This is the place where all the words live and the writing’s no good.

I should have linked to this when Mr. Somers’ wrote it, back in May, but it fell to the bottom of my list, after graduation. I wish it hadn’t; this is one of my favorite pieces on writing from this past year.

Thursday, 11 September 2014